Video

theatlanticcities:

"We walk much slower when handling a cell phone (even moreso while texting than reading), and we’re not very good at sticking to a straight line. Not surprisingly, we tend to keep our heads down, our necks immobile, and our arms locked at our sides. We don’t swing our arms, which can be a crucial part of staying balanced while moving."

Read: Texting Changes the Way You Walk

Hmm… I agree. Texting is bringing around a lot of change!

(via theatlantic)

Source: theatlanticcities
Video

Created for Visual Rhetoric and Multimodal Composition. I explored the anti-gay rhetoric in 2012 when I created this video. The puppet, Animal, signifies how absurd everything is. 

What do you think?

Text

Text

Created in Visual Rhetoric and Multimodal Composition. We were experimenting with the idea that…

Created in Visual Rhetoric and Multimodal Composition. We were experimenting with the idea that “A photo is worth 1,000 words.”

A bonus: I got to meet lots of awesome animals and their people.

View Post

Photo

awwww-cute:

We put him in the backyard for like 5 minutes by himself and this is what came back inside

Source: awwww-cute
Photo

theatlantic:

Sit Back, Relax, And Read That Long Story — on Your Phone

Earlier this month, Buzzfeed published a story called “Why I Bought a House in Detroit for $500.” It ended up getting more than a million pageviews, which is notable because the story is also more than 6,000 words long. The other notable thing: 47 percent of those views came from people accessing the story on mobile devices. And while people who read the piece on tablets spent an average of more than 12 minutes with the story, those doing so on phones  spent more than 25 minutes—a small eternity, in Internet time. 

Those stats are, if not counterintuitive, then counter-conventional: The working assumption, among media executives and most of the public who cares about such things, has long been that phones are best suited for quick-hit stories and tweets rather than immersive, longform reads. And while content producers have attempted to take advantage of the “lean-back” capabilities of the tablet (see, for example, tablet-optimized products like The Atavist), phone use has generally been seen as flitting and fleeting—the stuff of grocery store lines and bus rides. ”The average mobile reader tends to skim through headlines and snackable content as opposed to diving into long-form articles,” Mobile Marketer put it in late October.

Read more. [Image: kgnixer/Flickr]

Source: The Atlantic
Photo Set

love4my2cats:

Siblings’ love :)

I love the last gif and Bazyl’s “stay!” gesture :D

(via love4my2cats)

Source: love4my2cats
Photo

theatlantic:

U.S. Court: Bloggers Are Journalists

One of the great questions of our time came closer to resolution last week, when a federal court ruled that bloggers are journalists—at least when it comes to their First Amendment rights. 

The Ninth Circuit ruled as such on Friday in Obsidian Finance Group v. Crystal Cox, a complicated case first decided in 2011. The court found that even though someone might not write for the “institutional press,” they’re entitled to all the protections the Constitution grants journalists.

Read more. [Image: Lucas Jackson/Reuters]

Source: The Atlantic
Photo

theatlanticcities:

"The company’s FAQ page stresses that the Yellow Jacket can’t incapacitate someone the way a Taser does (which is by interrupting the nerve signals). Instead, the Yellow Jacket causes a burst of ‘mild to serious pain and definite discomfort’ to a localized part of the body. The current is also super bright and super loud. Basically, this thing is supposed to deter someone, and if that doesn’t work, scare them. But don’t expect it to render them helpless (that is, until Yellow Jacket releases its law enforcement model with twice the voltage and twice the amperage)."

Read: Yes, You Can Buy an iPhone Case That Doubles as a Stun Gun

(via theatlantic)

Source: theatlanticcities
Photo

theatlantic:

Life As a Nonviolent Psychopath

In 2005, James Fallon’s life started to resemble the plot of a well-honed joke or big-screen thriller: A neuroscientist is working in his laboratory one day when he thinks he has stumbled upon a big mistake. He is researching Alzheimer’s and using his healthy family members’ brain scans as a control, while simultaneously reviewing the fMRIs of murderous psychopaths for a side project. It appears, though, that one of the killers’ scans has been shuffled into the wrong batch.

The scans are anonymously labeled, so the researcher has a technician break the code to identify the individual in his family, and place his or her scan in its proper place. When he sees the results, however, Fallon immediately orders the technician to double check the code. But no mistake has been made: The brain scan that mirrors those of the psychopaths is his own.

After discovering that he had the brain of a psychopath, Fallon delved into his family tree and spoke with experts, colleagues, relatives, and friends to see if his behavior matched up with the imaging in front of him. He not only learned that few people were surprised at the outcome, but that the boundary separating him from dangerous criminals was less determinate than he presumed. Fallon wrote about his research and findings in the book The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey Into the Dark Side of the Brain, and we spoke about the idea of nature versus nurture, and what—if anything—can be done for people whose biology might betray their behavior.

Read more. [Image: barsen/flickr]

Source: The Atlantic
Photo
vvhatserface:

vvhatserface:

KITTY. WHAT HAVE YOU DONE?!


I HAVE MADE A MISTAKE

vvhatserface:

vvhatserface:

KITTY. WHAT HAVE YOU DONE?!

I HAVE MADE A MISTAKE

(via kimount)

Source: catleecious
Photo

mothernaturenetwork:

While on safari in Kenya recently, Australian photographer Chris Bray attached a GoPro camera to a remote-control car and drove it up to a couple of lion cubs.
 
The curious cubs cautiously approached the car to investigate, and the camera captured the adorable moment.
Watch the video.

Source: mothernaturenetwork
Photo
caterville:

Bouncy Kitty
Photo

condescending-magical-girl:

abaldwin360:

You have to love how much misinformation the pro-life movement spreads.

Hey pro lifers if pregnancies are actually like the one on the bottom then something is really wrong and you probably need an exorcist or something.

(via dont-touch-my-cats)

Source: blue-rose-of-illium
Photo Set