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wired:

Our Space Photo of the Day is glorious.

This thin, glowing streak of a galaxy may look lonely, but it’s got a companion galaxy just beyond the frame.

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Source: Wired
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theyuniversity:

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The colon is actually a pretty useful punctuation. It’s too bad that most people think it’s only good for making lists (and even then, most people misuse it).

The most important thing to know about colons is that the statement before the colon has to be a complete sentence, i.e., an independent clause.

In that regard, they are very much like semicolons.

However, unlike semicolons, colons do not have to be followed by complete sentences. In that sense, they are “superior” to semicolons. Perhaps that’s why semicolons have the “inferior” prefix “semi-” (half; partly).

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The colon is a versatile punctuation that does a lot more than start a list of items.

Put it to good use in your next post, tweet, or … essay!

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Source: theyuniversity
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Heroes in a Noun Phrase (Turtle Power)

superlinguo:

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (TMNT) were an integral part of my childhood. I’m not sure if I’ll see the creepy realistic new film, but seeing posters around for it has me humming the opening tune from the 1990s animated series (it’s as awesome as I remember).

One thing I’ve never really…

Source: superlinguo
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mothernaturenetwork:

Recipe: Herb-Stuffed Tomatoes
Tomatoes come to life with herbs, and baking them together deepens the flavor.

Source: mothernaturenetwork
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theyuniversity:

Here’s how compound (or joint) possessives work:

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But if two or more people share ownership of the same thing, and you want to use a possessive pronoun (e.g., my, your, his, her, our, their) instead of a person’s name, it should look like this:

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TRANSLATION: When someone looked inside a toilet, he or she found two things:

  1. SpongeBob
  2. My friend (Patrick Star)

Therefore, use the possessive [’s] after the person’s name.

And so, Anon, ”My friend’s and my favorite book is correct.

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Here is the Doctor and Amy’s favorite GIF*:

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* Not officially.

And here is a summary of this post:

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Source: theyuniversity
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theyuniversity:

How to Google like a pro.

Source: collegeessayguy
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catazoid:

As promised, here are some pictures of Lyalya’s first walk outside! Look at the bushy little squirrel tail :D the sandpit was her favorite spot! She was extremely excited and threw sand all over the place

(via catp0rn)

Source: catazoid
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awwww-cute:

Friends :)
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What's up with "than" and "then"?

theyuniversity:

We use than to make unequal comparisons (e.g., more than, less than, taller than, faster than, richer than).

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Need more examples?

  • I have more homework assignments to finish than you do.
  • Get back home no later than midnight, OK?
  • Jake claims that he loves food more than he…
Source: theyuniversity
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lifehackable:

Stretches that improve different aspects of your body.

(via positivelypersistentteach)

Source: lifehackable
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mastercatscinema:

Two perfect things perfect with each other.  

(via dogstercatster)

Source: mastercatscinema
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amandaonwriting:

Editing and Proofreading Tips

(via theyuniversity)

Source: amandaonwriting
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Habit Change for Newbies | Nerd Fitness

Source: backonpointe
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theyuniversity:

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Irregular verbs are a pain in the butt, and two of the most annoying ones are swim and begin.

To make things interesting, let’s begin with begin≖_≖

Begin becomes began in the simple past tense:

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Begun is the past participle of begin. In simpler terms, begun must come after “has,” “have,” or “had”:

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Swim works in the same way:

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For a list of other irregular verbs, click here.

We hope this answers your question.

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Source: theyuniversity